Help Centre for Employers

Setting up Pay Periods

A pay period is the tax period in the payroll, e.g. 1 – 12 for monthly payroll or 1 – 52 for weekly payroll.

You will need to enter the pay periods for each payroll to build up a payroll calendar in the site. You will need to ensure that a minimum of 3 months and a maximum of 12 months future pay periods are entered at any one time.  There are two ways of doing this:

Setting up pay periods using a CSV file

Setting up pay periods manually

Both methods are easy and straightforward. However, for weekly payrolls it might reduce the workload using the CSV file method as you can upload multiple pay periods in one go.

IMPORTANT. Regardless whether you chose to set up pay periods manually or using a CSV file it is extremely important to double check that you have entered the correct values for the Processing Date, Pay Period Start Date and Pay Year.

Related material

Guide to setting up pay periods

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